December 28, 2017

Certification of Jones Paves Way for Swearing in on Jan. 3


Doug Jones

Doug Jones, the new Alabama Senator

Washington, DC – Alabama made history on Thursday (Dec. 28) as state election officials certified Democrat Doug Jones the official winner of a Senate special election. Jones becomes the first Democratic senator to represent Alabama in 25 years. Jones won the Dec. 12 special election in the traditionally Republican state by a margin of 1.6 points.

India America Today in its report “Doug Jones Looks Set for Alabama Election Victory” on Dec. 10 had predicted a win for Jones before the election.

Welcoming the certification, Jones in a statement said, “I am looking forward to going to work for the people of Alabama in the new year.”

Reiterating his earlier promise, Jones added, “As I said on election night, our victory marks a new chapter for our state and the nation. I will be an independent voice and work to find common ground with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to get Washington back on track and fight to make our country a better place for all.”

His opponent Republican Roy Moore filed a lawsuit late Wednesday night, less than 24 hours before the election was to be certified, to delay certification, but Circuit Court Judge Johnny Hardwick denied Moore’s request, according to Al.com.

With the official certification in, Jones is expected to be sworn into office on Jan. 3, his spokesman confirmed.

Blow to Trump

The election result was a blow to US President Donald Trump, who gave Moore his full-throated support, even as other Republicans distanced themselves following the misconduct allegations. With tweets and rallies, President Trump threw his weight behind Moore, but to no avail.

Four women alleged that Moore, then in his early thirties, assaulted, molested or pursued them when they were teenagers, including sexually touching one when she was 14.

Moore, however, denied the allegations and said they were politically motivated. His supporters, including his wife Kayla Moore, cited unconfirmed theories that his accusers were paid.